Blog Archives

Recognizing the “In-line Borer”

One of the more curious signs on a tree is one or more rows of regular, shallow holes on the trunk. Usually, this is the work of the yellow-bellied sapsucker, a member of the woodpecker family. The sap that wells

Posted in Forest Trees, Landscape Trees & Shrubs

Emerald Ash Borer Outlook for 2017

Since its discovery in 2009, the emerald ash borer (EAB) has spread dramatically (Figure 1) within the Commonwealth. This spread will continue through short-range dispersal flights of the insect and long distance transport of infested wood, primarily firewood. Naturally, those

Posted in Forest Trees, Landscape Trees & Shrubs

Sawflies- Late Season Pine Defoliators

Sawflies are members of the insect order Hymenoptera that includes ants, bees, and wasps. The larval stage has a caterpillar-like body that may be brightly marked with stripes or spots. Some species change significantly in appearance as they grow, making

Posted in Forest Trees, Landscape Trees & Shrubs

Fall Webworm – Generation II

The second generation of fall webworm is underway and their distinctive silk nests should be abundant in many areas through August. These fuzzy caterpillars have pale green or yellow hairs over their bodies with rows of black spots along their

Posted in Forest Trees, Landscape Trees & Shrubs

Emerald Ash Borer Status

As of early July, the emerald ash borer (EAB) has been detected in 76 of Kentucky’s 120 counties (Figure 1).  It occurs throughout some of the earliest infested counties (red and yellow on map) but is present only at low

Posted in Forest Trees, Landscape Trees & Shrubs

Fall Webworm Tents Appearing

Fall webworm caterpillars feed on more than 100 species of deciduous trees. The first of two generations for summer is appearing now. Tiny larvae emerge from the 400 to 1,000 eggs deposited in a batch on leaves. Newly hatched caterpillars

Posted in Forest Trees, Landscape Trees & Shrubs

Jumping Oak Galls Scorch White Oaks

Jumping oak galls, made by tiny non-stinging wasps, are causing white oak leaves to turn brown (Figure 1) and drop in some areas. Brown-to-black spots appearing on upper leaf surfaces are discolorations created by gall formation. Tiny button-shaped galls can

Posted in Forest Trees, Landscape Trees & Shrubs