Blog Archives

Tree Wounds – Invitations to Wood Decay Fungi

Wood decay leads to loss of tree vigor and vitality, resulting in decline, dieback, and structural failure. Wounds play an important part in this process since they are the primary point of entry for wood decay pathogens. While other factors

Posted in Landscape Trees & Shrubs

Landscape Sanitation: Clean Up for Clean Plants

Autumn has arrived in Kentucky and, as leaves change color and fall from trees, it is time to focus on landscape sanitation. Good sanitation practices can help reduce disease-causing pathogens.  These organisms can survive for months or years on dead

Posted in Landscape Trees & Shrubs, Landscapes, Ornamentals

Armillaria Root Rot – A Threat to Stressed Landscape Trees

Tree stress can come from numerous factors, including weather, mechanical damage, insects, or poor growing conditions. These stresses make plants more susceptible to the plant disease Armillaria root rot. This fungal disease is also known as shoestring root rot, mushroom

Posted in Landscape Trees & Shrubs

Transplant Shock: Disease or Cultural Problem?

Autumn has arrived in Kentucky, and now is one of the best times to plant new trees. Cool-season planting allows trees to “focus” on root system development. Woody plants may take as long as 3 to 5 years to establish

Posted in Landscape Trees & Shrubs

Bringing the Web to Your Yard

Several web-making caterpillars can be active in late summer. They cooperate to bind leaves and branches together into unsightly, but protective, nests where the can feed more or less undisturbed. Species active at this time of year include the relatively

Posted in Landscape Trees & Shrubs

Stress and Decline in Woody Plants

Woody trees and shrubs may exhibit decline resulting from the stresses that can occur during their lives. Stress may be the result of improper plant or site selection, incorrect planting or maintenance practices, or poor soil conditions. Injury from equipment,

Posted in Landscape Trees & Shrubs

Steal Magnolias

The magnolia scale, about 1/2 inch in diameter, is a soft scale that feeds on magnolias. Undetected infestations steal sap and vigor from landscape trees while covering foliage with honeydew and the resulting sooty mold.  Heavily infested trees (Figure 1)

Posted in Landscape Trees & Shrubs