Blog Archives

Dealing with Pesticide Spills

A spill is an accidental release of any amount of pesticide, small or large. Spills on public highways, such as when a tank on a truck overturns, usually have major consequences. Failure to respond quickly and appropriately to such mishaps

Posted in Pesticide Topics

Avoiding Pesticide Drift Is the Applicator’s Responsibility

Language and restrictions regarding pesticide drift vary among products, but all put the responsibility clearly with the applicator. One insecticide label states: Only apply this product if the wind direction favors on-target deposition. Do not apply when the wind velocity

Posted in Pesticide Topics

Spray Equipment Cleanup Saves Time and Money

Time spent in sprayer cleanup can reduce maintenance downtime and even cause costly crop injury. If you will be applying the same product the next day, then flushing the system with water may be sufficient. That will wash out accumulations

Posted in Pesticide Topics

Gloves Are First Line of Defense

Pesticide handlers get by far the most exposure from pesticides on their hands and forearms. Research has shown that workers mixing pesticides received 85% of the total exposure on their hands and 13% on their forearms. The same study showed

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Reducing Pesticide Drift

Drift is the uncontrolled movement of a pesticide away from its target area. Drift can damage susceptible off-target sites (plants, animals, etc.), reduces pest control (which wastes the pesticide and money), and contaminates the environment (water pollution and illegal pesticide

Posted in Pesticide Topics

Pesticide Handling Practices

Precautions Read the pesticide label before beginning to mix, load, and apply pesticides. Take the following precautions: Have detergent or soap and an adequate supply of water available. Learn the first aid procedures for the pesticides you are using, and

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Surface Temperature Inversions and Spray Drift

Usually, when the sun’s energy hits the ground, it warms the air at the surface. This warm air normally expands and cools as it rises, so air temperature decreases with altitude. A temperature inversion occurs when a layer of cool

Posted in Pesticide Topics