Blog Archives

Diseases Rearing Their Ugly “Heads” in Small Grain Crops

A number of diseases that affect heads of small grain crops have been observed in Kentucky over the last few weeks. Fusarium Head Blight One of the “usual suspects” that is no stranger to Kentucky is Fusarium head blight (a.k.a.

Posted in Grains

Scout for Armyworms

There have been several reports of true armyworm in pastures, small grains, and corn in Western Kentucky, and high numbers have been captured in Lexington and Princeton traps. So far, the reports on caterpillar damage include clipping of small heads

Posted in Grains

Harvest Aid in Wheat

Cool temperatures during late-winter and early-spring delayed wheat development across much of Kentucky earlier this year. Even as recently as early May, some reports that wheat was around 5 to 7 days ‘late’ (as compared to most years) were common.

Posted in Grains, Pesticide Topics

Sivanto Prime Available on Sweet Sorghum for 2018

The Kentucky Department of Agriculture (KDA) just announced that Kentucky will again have Sivanto Prime available for use on sweet sorghum to fight sugarcane aphid (Figure 1). This is good news as this insecticide is so effective and the sugarcane

Posted in Grains, Pesticide Topics

Considerations for Fungicide Management of Fusarium Head Blight (Scab) of Wheat

Wheat fields are beginning to flower in western Kentucky.  Flowering (anthesis) is a critical time, as wheat becomes susceptible to infection by Fusarium graminearum, the causal agent of Fusarium head blight (FHB; also known as scab) (Figure 1). This disease can cause

Posted in Grains

Don’t Let a Compressed Spring Force Bad Weed Control Decisions

When a spring season is compressed, it puts pressure on things around it.  This is true if you are talking about a spring in the physical form or the season of spring in the agricultural world.  The spring of 2018

Posted in Grains

Slugs in Wheat Fields: A Management Challenge for Farmers and Researchers

Key Features of Slugs Slugs are mollusks and do not have legs.  In order to travel, they secrete a mucus from a gland located at the anterior part of their bodies. This mucus helps slugs and snails slide over surfaces,

Posted in Grains