From Tree Thief to Holiday Tradition: The Story of Mistletoe

Once autumn leaves have fallen, mistletoe becomes highly visible on large trees throughout Kentucky. Phoradendron, the scientific name for Kentucky’s most common type of this parasitic plant, means tree thief. These small leafy plants are commonly found on twigs and

Posted in Landscape Trees & Shrubs

“Wet Feet” of Ornamentals

“Wet feet” is the common term for a condition that affects plant species intolerant of wet growing conditions. This problem occurs when soils become saturated with water, which ultimately causes roots to suffocate. Once root damage occurs, plants decline and

Posted in Landscape Trees & Shrubs, Ornamentals

Pesticide certification: Who needs it?

There has been some confusion with respect to who is required to have pesticide certification — either private or commercial certification. This article is based on information provided by the Kentucky Department of Agriculture (KDA) to clarify this issue. KDA

Posted in Pesticide Topics

Black Knot

Black knot is a common, often serious, disease of plums and cherries in Kentucky. Trees in both commercial and residential plantings are susceptible to the disease. Black knot results in knotty growths that, over time, encircle limbs and result in

Posted in Fruit

Featured Publication

Cane Diseases of Brambles (PPFS-FR-S-17) Several cane diseases commonly lead to the formation of cankers in Kentucky bramble plantings.  If left unchecked, these fungal diseases significantly reduce overall yields and limit the longevity of bramble plantings. This publication discusses the

Posted in Featured Publications

Tree Wounds – Invitations to Wood Decay Fungi

Wood decay leads to loss of tree vigor and vitality, resulting in decline, dieback, and structural failure. Wounds play an important part in this process since they are the primary point of entry for wood decay pathogens. While other factors

Posted in Landscape Trees & Shrubs

Tree Chiggers: Oak Leaves with a Bite

Dealing with chiggers is never pleasant but is an expected risk taken when venturing into tall grass during mid- to late summer. Unfortunately, there are other ways to have chigger-like experiences. The oak leaf itch mite can give the same

Posted in Human Pests