Monthly Archives: February 2017

Tale of Two Weevils

Alfalfa weevils (AW) are the key pest of the first alfalfa cutting in Kentucky. These green, legless larvae (Figure 1) initially chew small “pin holes” in developing tip foliage (Figure 2). The clover leaf weevil (CLW) is a second species

Posted in Forages

Earlier Aphid Occurrences on Wheat May Be a Consequence of the 2017’s Warm Winter

In Kentucky, there is a complex of aphid species that feeds on wheat. Bird cherry oat (Figure1a), English grain (Figure1b), greenbug, and corn leaf aphid are the most important species. Their role as vectors of plant viruses, particularly barley yellow

Posted in Grains

Emerald Ash Borer Outlook for 2017

Since its discovery in 2009, the emerald ash borer (EAB) has spread dramatically (Figure 1) within the Commonwealth. This spread will continue through short-range dispersal flights of the insect and long distance transport of infested wood, primarily firewood. Naturally, those

Posted in Forest Trees, Landscape Trees & Shrubs

Spring Awakenings for Some Early Season Insects

Grass Sawfly Wasps Grass sawfly wasps are among the first insects to appear in spring. They often chose to rest on light-colored surfaces. Grass sawfly adults are shiny, black 3/8-inch-long insects (Figure 1) with thin black antennae about as long as

Posted in Landscapes

Plant Disease Diagnostic Lab Highlights

Although the diagnostic season is not yet in full swing, several greenhouse samples have been received recently.  In addition, unseasonably warm weather during most of January and February has prompted submission of more landscape samples than we typically see in

Posted in Plant Disease Diagnostic Lab

Watch For Early Alfalfa Weevil Damage

There was a resurgence of alfalfa weevil damage in some parts of Kentucky in 2016, so it is reasonable to be prepared for higher-than-normal feeding on the first cutting in 2017. In addition, the mild winter sets the stage for

Posted in Forages

Will Introduced Pine Sawflies Return?

The caterpillar-like larvae of the introduced pine sawfly prefer to feed on needles of eastern white pine but also will feed on Scotch, red, Austrian, jack, and Swiss mountain pine. They may feed on short leaf and Virginia pines, but usually

Posted in Landscape Trees & Shrubs