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Weevil Watch

Alfalfa weevil populations are continuing to develop with mostly small larvae (less than 1/8 inches long) (Figure 1) collected in sweep samples taken from 4- to 6-inch alfalfa in three Fayette county fields on March 24, 2017. While not an

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Alfalfa Weevil Feeding Underway – Injury Potential Is A Numbers Game

Alfalfa weevil is the major insect pest of the first alfalfa cutting. Kentucky’s mild winter has pushed development significantly ahead so feeding by weevil larvae is appearing early. The February 21, 2017 issue of KPN provided a look at the

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Tale of Two Weevils

Alfalfa weevils (AW) are the key pest of the first alfalfa cutting in Kentucky. These green, legless larvae (Figure 1) initially chew small “pin holes” in developing tip foliage (Figure 2). The clover leaf weevil (CLW) is a second species

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Watch For Early Alfalfa Weevil Damage

There was a resurgence of alfalfa weevil damage in some parts of Kentucky in 2016, so it is reasonable to be prepared for higher-than-normal feeding on the first cutting in 2017. In addition, the mild winter sets the stage for

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Alfalfa Weevils Return to Fields after a Summer Rest

Alfalfa Weevil Development Newly emerged alfalfa weevils (Figure 1) usually leave fields between late May and early June. These small brown snout beetles find hiding places under surface debris or loose tree bark and enter an inactive state that lasts

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Stem Breaks from Alfalfa Hopper

Steve Osborne, Allen County Agriculture and Natural Resources Extension agent, recently reported damage to alfalfa by the three-cornered alfalfa hopper. These green, wedge-shaped insects jab their piercing-sucking mouthparts into stems, lateral branches, or petioles as they feed on legumes. Plants

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Surge of Fall Armyworms May Affect Pastures and Cover Crops in Kentucky

Fall armyworms (Spodoptera frugiperda) do not survive the winter temperatures of Kentucky and surrounding states, and every year there is a northward migration in the continental U.S. These migrant moths originate from populations that overwinter in southern Florida or southern

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