Green June Beetles

Green June beetles (Figure 1) fly noisily and unpredictably over the ground, occasionally crashing into objects or people as males search for females, and females search for soil with high organic matter content. Females lay batches of up to 75 eggs in balls of soil that they fashion belowground. Larvae may prune some grass roots as they feed on organic matter in the soil. However, their movements can create spongy areas in the soil and loosen turf or uproot seedlings, thus, creating bare spots.  Birds, skunks, and other animals may create greater damage as they dig for the large succulent white grubs (Figure 2).

Figure 1. Green June beetles feed on over-ripe and decaying fruit and tips of corn ears (Photo: Lee Townsend, UK).

Figure 1. Green June beetles feed on over-ripe and decaying fruit and tips of corn ears (Photo: Lee Townsend, UK).

Figure 2. Green June beetle grubs (Photo: Lee Townsend, UK).

Figure 2. Green June beetle grubs (Photo: Lee Townsend, UK).

 

By Lee Townsend, Extension Entomologist

 

 

 

Posted in Lawn & Turf