Emerald Ash Borer Found In Madison and Mercer Counties

Joe Collins, Senior Nursery Inspector in the Office of the State Entomologist, captured an emerald ash borer (EAB) in a trap placed at Fort Boonesboro; this is the first discovery of this insect in Madison County. Jessica Cole, Mercer County Extension Horticulture Agent, reported a finding from Mercer County, as well. The map (Figure 1) depicts the known distribution of EAB in Kentucky at this time. Infestation levels and ash mortality are: high (red), moderate (yellow), low (green), and undetected (white).

Figure 1. Known emerald ash borer distribution in Kentucky. Infestation levels and ash mortality are coded as follows: red=high, yellow=moderate, green=low, and white=undetected.

Figure 1. Known emerald ash borer distribution in Kentucky. Infestation levels and ash mortality are coded as follows: red=high, yellow=moderate, green=low, and white=undetected.

EAB adults should still be active but flight should be declining. Females live about 3 weeks; each lays 30 to 60 eggs, which hatch in 2 to 3 weeks.  Newly hatched larvae tunnel through outer bark into the phloem where their galleries disrupt water and nutrient transport. Feeding generally ends in October. Larvae then pass the winter in cells they create in the sapwood or outer bark.

 

 

By Lee Townsend, Extension Entomologist

 

 

Posted in Forest Trees, Landscape Trees & Shrubs