Emerald Ash Borer Confirmed In Trimble County

An emerald ash borer (EAB) adult was found last week in Trimble County. Although it was in the original limited quarantine area (Figure 1), this is the first finding of the insect there. At this time, the degree of infestation varies greatly. EAB has not been detected, or has been found only in very low numbers in some counties lying within the core area bounded by Lexington, Louisville, and northern Kentucky. More information, including an assessment of infestations, is available on the Kentucky EAB Web page (http://pest.ca.uky.edu/EXT/EAB/welcomeeab.html)

Figure 1. Counties previously under limited state quarantines for emerald ash borer are shaded green . This insect was found last week in Trimble County (orange).

Figure 1. Counties previously under limited state quarantines for emerald ash borer are shaded green. This insect was found last week in Trimble County (orange).

The familiar purple EAB survey traps will not be hung across the state this year so detection of the spread of this insect will rely on alert observers.  It is prime time to detect infestations.

  • Adult activity should be at its peak now; they are usually in tops of trees.
  • Feeding by EAB adults causes damaged leaves to release volatile chemicals that attract both sexes of the insect.
  • EAB feeds for 5 to 7 days before mating and another 5 to 7 days before laying eggs.
  • Females will lay 60 to 90 eggs under bark ridges.

Whether you live in a county marked in green, orange, or white on the above map, if you suspect that EAB is present, contact the Office of the State Entomologist by phone (859- 257-5838) or email (ky-ose@lsv.uky.edu), or alert your local Cooperative Extension Service office.

 

By Lee Townsend, Extension Entomologist

Posted in Forest Trees, Landscape Trees & Shrubs